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Child Porn and Luring Archives

Can anime be child pornography?

There has been a steady increase in child pornography proseuctions over the last 10 years, partly as a result on the ease at which it can be found online. In some cases it is relatively easy to determine what constitutes child pornography, for instance videos or photographs depicting young children involved in sexual activities. In other cases, it may be more difficult. One example of that is in the ares of cartoons or anime. Do they constitute child pornography or not? The answer is that it depends.

Can anime be child pornography?

There has been a steady increase in child pornography proseuctions over the last 10 years, partly as a result on the ease at which it can be found online.  In some cases it is relatively easy to determine what constitutes child pornography, for instance videos or photographs depicting young children involved in sexual activities.  In other cases, it may be more difficult.  One example of that is in the ares of cartoons or anime.  Do they constitute child pornography or not?  The answer is that it depends.

Court of Appeal releases decision on extradition in internet luring case

The Court of Appeal of Ontario recently released a judgment in an extradition case involving a deportation order to the United States against a man alleged to have committed charges of internet luring, child exploitation and child pornography

Private Use Defence to Child Pornography Considered by Supreme Court of Canada

A person charged with possessing or making child pornography can raise what is known as a "private use exception" as a defence.  The limits of this defence were recently considered by the Supreme Court of Canada in the case of R. v. Barabash.

R v Spencer: Internet Anonymity Protected by Supreme Court

Last week the Supreme Court of Canada ("SCC") released a decision in a case called R v Spencer with the court upholding internet user's anonymity. The law now requires police officers to get a search warrant before being able to get a user's information from their ISP ("Internet Service Provider"). Prior to this judgment, ISPs would provide police forces with user information tied to an IP address upon a request without a warrant or court order. The SCC ruled that Canadians have a reasonable expectation of privacy associated with their internet use. The SCC also confirmed that the Charter-protected right against unreasonable searches is engaged when police attempt to obtain user information matching an IP address.

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